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About Hurricane Laura

Prior to making landfall in the US, Laura had produced serious damage and took nearly two dozen lives across Hati and the Dominican Republic. As it was moving through the Gulf of Mexico, Laura quickly grew from a Category 1 to a Category 4 within 24 hours. In the early morning of August 27th, Hurricane Laura made landfall to the US Coast as the seventh named storm to do so this hurricane season.

At landfall, Hurricane Laura had wind speeds of up to 150 mph, causing mass construction along the border of Texas and Louisiana.

What’s Next?

A couple of days after the storm had passed, President Trump toured the damage in Orange, Texas and Lake Charles, Louisiana. Mr. Trump vowed assistance for both cities, saying in Texas that “we’ve never seen anything like” the force of the storm. He said that FEMA would deliver 400,000 liters of water and 200,000 meals for those who were affected by Laura.

Texas Governor Greg Abbott said that he has declared a disaster in 62 counties and their priorities are “power, water, evacuees, assessment.”

Residents and business owners have finally started to return to the area to assess the damages. Power and water outages are still affecting tens of thousands of people across the area, with no Return Date near.Helping Texas in the wake of Hurricane Laura 2020

How You Can Help

The following organizations have set up individual campaigns dedicated to those who have been affected by Hurricane Laura. Donate and volunteer as you are able!

Were you or someone you know affected by Hurricane Laura? Not sure where to start? Contact ICRS today!

According to the catastrophe risk modeling firm, Karen Clark & Company, the total insured losses from Hurricane Hanna could reach up to $350 million.

What does the estimate include?

Karen Clark & Company reported the estimate includes the privately insured wind and storm surge damage to residential, commercial/industrial properties and automobiles. The estimate does not include the National Flood Insurance Program losses.

Hurricane Hanna Damages

Hurricane Hanna brought high wind speeds to southern Texas and had over 200,000 customers without power.Hurricane Hanna Damage Insurance Claims

Low to moderate levels of wind damage was sustained throughout the Rio Grande Valley. Damage to signage and lightweight structures, such as gas station pavilions and marinas, were relatively common as well.

Other forms of damage included roof and siding damage with rare instances of more severe structural damage. Corpus Christi, Port Mansfield, McAllen, and other coastal towns all experienced storm surge flooding to residential and commercial buildings.

To read about Hurricane Hanna, check out our blog, “Hurricane Hanna Hits Southern Texas”.

To check out the original article from the Insurance Journal, click here.

About Hurricane Hanna

After several days of uncertainty, Hurricane Hanna made landfall as a Category 1 on July 25, 2020, hitting Padre Island the hardest. After landfall, the storm traveled southwest and weakened rapidly due to interaction with mountainous terrain and by July 26 had weakened into a tropical storm as it passed into Mexico.

Corpus Christi, Port Mansfield and many other coastal towns also experienced storm surge flooding to residential and commercial buildings from the hurricane.

Hurricane Hanna Damage

Hundreds of thousands of residents and business owners across southern Texas prepped for the storm damage to come, however, they couldn’t prepare for everything.

Hurricane Hanna was the first hurricane and the fourth U.S. landfalling storm of the 2020 North Atlantic hurricane season.

Losses

The latest reports have stated that insured losses from Hurricane Hanna will reach close to $350 million.

High wind speeds left more than 200,000 customers without power in South Texas, while low to moderate levels of wind damage were sustained throughout the Rio Grande Valley. Due to the high wind speeds, damage to signage and lightweight structures were relatively common. Additionally, damage to roofs and siding as well as several instances of structural damage have all been reported.

Downed power lines and trees caused road closures across Southern Texas. As of 1 p.m on Monday, July 27th, the American Electric Power Texas, one of the state’s largest electric providers, reported more than 58,000 power outages in Corpus Christi, Laredo and the Rio Grande Valley alone.

Have you suffered from damages caused by Hurricane Hanna? Contact us today!